First steps in differential geometry riemannian contact symplectic

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first steps in differential geometry riemannian contact symplectic

First Steps in Differential Geometry: Riemannian, Contact, Symplectic by Andrew McInerney

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Published 16.12.2018

Symplectic Geometry and Mirror Symmetry with Hansol Hong

Introduces symplectic and contact geometry alongside Riemannian the first four semesters in calculus, linear algebra, and differential equations to the higher .
Andrew McInerney

ISBN 13: 9781489990464

Published by Springer Seller Rating:. About this Item: Springer, Condition: As New. Boards are square, flat, and clean. Tight binding.

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Unlike other texts in differential geometry, this book develops the architecture necessary to introduce symplectic and contact geometry alongside its Riemannian cousin. Emphasizes the consequences of a definition and the use of examples and constructions. Differential geometry arguably offers the smoothest transition from the standard university mathematics sequence of the first four semesters in calculus, linear algebra, and differential equations to the higher levels of abstraction and proof encountered at the upper division by mathematics majors. Today it is possible to describe differential geometry as "the study of structures on the tangent space," and this text develops this point of view. This book, unlike other introductory texts in differential geometry, develops the architecture necessary to introduce symplectic and contact geometry alongside its Riemannian cousin. The main goal of this book is to bring the undergraduate student who already has a solid foundation in the standard mathematics curriculum into contact with the beauty of higher mathematics. In particular, the presentation here emphasizes the consequences of a definition and the careful use of examples and constructions in order to explore those consequences.

About this book

The Basic Library List Committee suggests that undergraduate mathematics libraries consider this book for acquisition. Prior to looking at this book, I had always assumed that there was a fairly clear-cut distinction between undergraduate and graduate differential geometry. The former subject once a fairly standard course offering in the American undergraduate curriculum, now unfortunately much less often seen by undergraduates involved curves and surfaces in the Euclidean plane and three-dimensional space as in, for example, Elements of Differential Geometry by Millman and Parker, or, more recently, Differential Geometry of Curves and Surfaces by Banchoff and Lovett , and the latter studied abstract differentiable manifolds, typically with the ultimate goal of defining a Riemannian metric on the manifold and thus being able to study curvature. See, e. The book under review intentionally blurs this distinction and also introduces topics like contact geometry and symplectic geometry that are sometimes not even encountered in introductory graduate courses, much less undergraduate ones.

It seems that you're in Germany. We have a dedicated site for Germany. Differential geometry arguably offers the smoothest transition from the standard university mathematics sequence of the first four semesters in calculus, linear algebra, and differential equations to the higher levels of abstraction and proof encountered at the upper division by mathematics majors. Today it is possible to describe differential geometry as "the study of structures on the tangent space," and this text develops this point of view. This book, unlike other introductory texts in differential geometry, develops the architecture necessary to introduce symplectic and contact geometry alongside its Riemannian cousin.

5 thoughts on “First Steps in Differential Geometry: Riemannian, Contact, Symplectic by Andrew McInerney

  1. Differential geometry arguably offers the smoothest transition from the standard university mathematics sequence of the first four semesters in calculus, linear algebra, and differential equations to the higher levels of abstraction and proof encountered at the upper division by mathematics majors.

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